Some Case Studies

Game programming is something I’ve been interested in since I was about 11 years old. I started by making simple programs and games in Visual Basic. Shortly afterwards, I made my bumbling way into the world of 3D game development, and I completed many projects using DarkBASIC. All of my games were very simple, but this is the reason I finished them: they were small and built on well-established mechanics such as jumping, collecting treasure, shooting, or racing against time.

Featured below are a few of my favourite completed game projects from way back when. They were all made for my own amusement, and are all from a time when I could barely program to save my life. Or make game art. Or anything.

Goblin Stoppers

goblin-stoppers

Jump from platform to platform as you try to escape the lava-filled cave. Home to baby dragons hungry for their first taste of goblin flesh, the cave is also rumoured to hold treasure that renders the finder completely invulnerable…

I consider this to be my very first fully-playable computer game. Its simple mechanics, combined with a small map size, made this project a reasonable first.

Space Havoc 1, 2, and 3

space-havoc-1space-havoc-2space-havoc-3

Fight for your life in open space against skilled pilots determined to prove their worth.

The first version of this space-based combat game was incredibly simple, and started to grow in complexity as the project matured. It spawned a total of three titles. There were a few attempts to make a much more complex fourth title, but these designs eventually became part of Gateway.

Cavin’ In

cavin-in

Fight against time to collect all the treasure in a maze from which no one has ever returned. Lava flows around every corner, while fire goblins lie in wait for their next meal.

The idea here was to navigate through a dark cave in search of treasure, avoiding lava and catching glimpses of scary fire goblins while a lightning storm raged outdoors. Again, this was a very simple game with a simple goal: run through a large maze collecting items as you go, before time runs out and the cave collapses.

Space Fire

space-fire

Use an assortment of weapons in a deep-space duel to the death. Only one of you will survive.

This was a two-player game, where each player had an assortment of weapons (laser bolts, laser charges, and missiles) with which to kill each other. Players could also take cover behind the asteroids (which could be destroyed, too). Unfortunately, no one ever played it with me more than once, because I was too good at it.

Shufflespace

shufflespace

A twist on a classic sport, Shufflespace puts a 23rd-century spin on a well-known game.

The goal of this game was to aim and shoot a laser from the far end of a shuffleboard, and take down all of the miniature aliens at the other end. The alien formations could be customized, and the game even supported something called “live mode”, where the aliens would walk around at random, making them more difficult to hit.

Cavern

cavern

Lost in a frozen maze, you find yourself attacked by vicious monsters that have made the cavern their home. Armed with only your wits and an ice-spewing gun that freezes everything it hits, only tenacity will ensure your survival.

This game didn’t have any time limits, but there was one important constraint: your gun had limited energy and depleted quickly as you fired. Energy crystals found within the cave would help to replenish its reserves, but most of them were guarded by the locals.

Water World

water-world

While not technically a game, this partially-submerged cavern was a good way to test various environmental effects and AI behaviours. Rumour has it that deep within the depths of the stone fort inside, mysterious life advice lies scrawled upon the ruins.

GN

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s